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Latest 2019-2020 LATCH Manual Update

Honda, Lexus, Toyota

Download All 2019-2020 LATCH Manual Updates (PDF)

Page B-108, Honda

REASON FOR UPDATE: Addition of new model and an owner’s manual clarification.
Click here for a PDF that has been formatted so it can be printed, cut out, and attached to page B-108.
Add the text in red:

Passport SUV 19-20  LATCH (2) LATCH (3) TAs on backs of seats
Owner’s Manual (OM) Clarification: Some MY19 OMs indicate that only the outboard positions of the 2nd row are equipped with LATCH; in fact, there is also a standard LATCH system in the center seating position, as well.

Page B-139, Lexus

REASON FOR UPDATE: Addition of an owner’s manual clarification.
Click here for a PDF that has been formatted so it can be printed, cut out, and attached to page B-139.
Revise the following by adding the text in red:

UX Crossover 19 TA (2) LATCH (3) TAs on backs of seats
Center: May borrow inner LA bars of outboard LATCH to install CR. If used for center, LAs may not be used for either OB position. Space between inner LAs is 15.6 inches (396 mm).
Head Restraints (HRs): To tether, route a 2-point (single-strap) tether over the center of the HR, and a 3-point (V-shaped) tether around each side.
Owner’s Manual (OM) Clarification: Although some OMs do not state that a CR may be installed in the center seating position using LATCH, the vehicle manufacturer says it IS safe to install a CR there, per the notes above, and that doing so is approved IF proper installation is achieved.

Page B-208, Toyota

REASON FOR UPDATE: Addition of Canada-specific information and information to clarify the location of the lower anchors.
Click here for a PDF that has been formatted so it can be printed, cut out, and attached to pages B-208.
Revise the following by adding the text in red:

Prius V 4-door
Wagon
12-18 TA (2) LATCH (3) TAs on backs of seats. TAs are lower on seatback than cargo area floor. Slide vehicle seat forward to hook tether to TA, then return it to its rear-most position to install CR.
Lower Anchors: Bars are below the bight, in zippered vertical slits in the vehicle upholstery. Find LA photos at www.saferidenews.com, LATCH Gallery.
Vehicle Seatback: Put the seatback in the first locked position to install a CR with LATCH.
MY18: In this model year, this model sold in Canada only.

Page B-213, Toyota

REASON FOR UPDATE: Addition of information to clarify which model was sold where and in what model year.
Click here for a PDF that has been formatted so it can be printed, cut out, and attached to pages B-213.
Revise the following by replacing deleting the struck-out text and adding the text in red:

Yaris HB 06-1819 TA (2) LATCH (3) TAs on backs of seats, near or below cargo floor. To improve access to TAs, slide seat forward. Find TA photos at www.saferidenews.com, LATCH Gallery.
Cargo Cover: If cargo cover is installed, lift rear hatch and then route tether between vehicle seat and cargo cover remove to access tether anchor. Reinstall after tether installation.
Head Restraints (HRs): To tether, remove and securely stow HR; replace HR when CR is uninstalled. (Exception: For MY06-11 vehicles with non-split seat option, reinstall HR after attaching tether.)
Vehicle Seatback, MY06-11: Put the seatback in the first locked position to install a CR.
MY19: In this model year, this model sold in Canada only.
4-door
Sedan
06-12 TA (2) LATCH (3) TAs on rear filler panel
Head Restraints (HRs), MY06-10: To tether, remove and securely stow HR; replace the HR when CR is uninstalled.
16-19 TA (2) LATCH (3) TAs on rear filler panel
Center, MY16 and Newer (Canada) and MY19 and newer (U.S.): May borrow inner LA bars of outboard LATCH to install CR. If used for center, LAs may not be used for either outboard position. Space between inner LAs is 14.2 inches (360 mm).
Head Restraints (HRs): Remove and securely stow HR (regardless of whether tether is used). Replace the HR when CR is uninstalled.
Yaris
Yaris iA
4-door
Sedan
15-19
17-18
TA
(see note)
(2) LATCH (3) TAs on rear filler panel
Center, MY16 and Newer (Canada) and MY17 and newer (U.S.): May borrow inner LA bars of outboard LATCH to install CR. If used for center, LAs may not be used for either outboard position. Space between inner LAs is 14.2 inches (360 mm).

Page B-217, Toyota

REASON FOR UPDATE: Revision of vehicle seatback information. Note: There are no changes to MY04-10.
Click here for a PDF that has been formatted so it can be printed, cut out, and attached to pages B-217.
Revise the following by replacing the struck-out text with the text in red:

Sienna 11-14 7-passenger:
N/A
8- passenger:
None
(2) LATCH LATCH
(offset to outboard-behind-
driver side)
None (3) TAs (MY11-14) or (4) TAs (MY15-19) on backs of seats; to find unlabeled 3rd row TA, lift flap at lower back of seatback. DO NOT use 3rd row cargo anchors as TAs.
Vehicle Seatback: Find photos at www.saferidenews.com, LATCH Gallery. To install a CR with LATCH:
   2nd Row: Place the seatback in the rear-most recline position.
   3rd Row Manual Seat: Recline the seatback to the eleventh locked position from most upright.
2nd Row and 3rd Row Manual Seat: Recline the seatback, as described in the OM, to expose the lower anchors in the seat bight. Once the LA connectors are attached to the LAs, it is permissible to adjust the vehicle seatback to a more upright position that provides a good CR-to-vehicle-seat fit, as defined in the NHTSA or CPSAC standardized curriculum.
3rd Row Power Seat: Raise seatback to its upright position by pressing the seatback angle adjustment switch.
15-19 Behind-
passenger
side: LATCH

New School Bus Resource Defines Best Practice by Child Age

Safe Kids Worldwide recently compiled a best-practice document for CPS on school buses. Entitled Best Practice: Child Passenger Safety Securement Recommendations for Pre-School and School Age Children on School Buses, the document is laid out in a grid fashion. Rows list the child-age groups that signify distinct stages for CPS on school buses (starting with infants), while the columns give best-practice guidance, explanations/citations, and the rationale for distinguishing each child-age category.

Read More from “New School Bus Resource Defines Best Practice by Child Age”

Tip for Euro-routing when a lap-shoulder belt seems too short:

Have you noticed that it’s become more common for RF-only car seat instructions to allow European belt routing (aka, Euro-routing) for baseless installations?   If a car seat model allows this method, but the vehicle belt appears to be too short, try this technique.

  1. Route the lap portion of the belt through the CR belt path guides (across the child’s leg area), but don’t buckle the belt yet.
  2. Wrap the shoulder portion of the belt around the back of the CR (following model-specific instructions, if any, for using a guide on the back of the CR shell).
  3. Buckle the belt, and then complete installation, as instructed, by setting the CR to the proper angle and tightening the belt.

Finding Lap-Shoulder Belts to Be Too Short for Euro-Routing? Try This Tip

FMVSS 213 requires CRs to be tested while installed using a lap-only belt.  Therefore, there is no required U.S. test to measure the effectiveness of installations using Euro-routing, since that technique involves a lap-shoulder belt. However, from experience in Europe and through voluntary testing, many manufacturers recognize the benefits of Euro-routing and choose to offer it as an option on CRs sold in North America.

If a lap-shoulder belt seems to be too short for Euro-routing, try this technique:

  1. Route the lap portion of the belt through the CR belt path guides (across the child’s leg area), but don’t buckle the belt.
  2. Wrap the shoulder portion of the belt around the back of the CR (following model-specific instructions, if any, for using a guide on the back of the CR shell).
  3. Buckle the belt, and then complete installation, as instructed, by setting the CR to the proper angle and tightening the belt.

By buckling the belt after the shoulder belt has been routed (not before), a belt that may seem to be too short for Euro-routing is often ample. This technique is also less likely to tempt the user to tilt the top of CR shell forward to enable shoulder belt placement (which can be awkward or even risky if a baby is seated in the CR).

Calling Out Fakes, Knockoffs, and Imposters—NOW A FREE WEBINAR!

UPDATE:  Due to the cancelation of the Lifesavers Conference, the session mentioned in the following article will be offered instead as a Safe Kids-hosted live webinar:

How to Tell if a Car Seat is Legit—or NOT
April 23, 2:00 EST.
Space is limited! Register today at https://bit.ly/2J06dsP


One of the many excellent sessions planned for the Lifesavers Conference (March 15–17 in Tampa, Florida) focuses on noncompliant CRs, a very timely topic. Attendees will hear from a CR manufacturer and a CPST-I who has reported non-compliant CRs seen in the field. In addition, a representative of NHTSA will explain various regulatory considerations of these products.

As a member of the Lifesavers planning committee, SRN’s Denise Donaldson has been gathering examples, both online and in person, of the growing number of noncompliant products seen in this country. Readers who encounter unusual products are urged to share this information by emailing a detailed description and photos to info@saferidenews.com.

Manufacturers must self-certify CRs, and most products are designed and sold by trustworthy, legitimate companies. However, the public must be vigilant about noncompliant devices, especially ones presented for sale online by vendors who may feel safely concealed from accountability. Sadly, the online marketplace has certainly made it easier for unscrupulous vendors to sell products in the U.S. and Canada that don’t meet applicable regulations.

As this topic has been hot lately, including in mainstream media, many terms have been used to describe problematic devices. SRN deems it time, therefore, to consider terminology a little more closely.

Legitimate CRs Are FMVSS 213-Compliant

First, it’s important to know what it means for a CR to be “213-compliant”—a legitimate CR. A compliant product meets all the performance, structural integrity, and labeling standards of NHTSA’s Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 213, and it fits the definition of one of the CR types to which the standard applies. Therefore, it must be a product for a child who weighs less than 80 pounds and be a rear-facing CR, forward-facing CR, belt-positioning booster seat, car bed, or harness system. The CR may be an add-on or built-in, and the regulation applies to CRs used in any motor vehicle (including school buses) or aircraft. In state child occupant protection (COP) laws, the use of only FMVSS 213-compliant CRs is specified.  (Note for Canadian readers: Although this article is U.S.-centric, much of the content applies to Canada; replace U.S. terms (like FMVSS 213) with their Canadian counterparts.

Whenever possible, refer to any noncompliant product that poses as or competes with compliant CRs a “device,” rather than a child restraint. That way, the term “child restraint” is reserved for legitimate products that truly meet standards. But, among these non-CR devices, there are different types. SRN suggests CPSTs consider the following categories:

Fakes/Frauds

Knockoffs: Devices that are inferior copies of particular 213-compliant CR models. In recent months, SRN has heard about knock-offs of the Doona CR and certain Graco RF-only CRs. The makers of these devices rip off the companies they imitate; even worse, the knockoffs are made of substandard materials that lack the strength and integrity of the real thing, do not meet standards, and are a huge risk to children. Warn caregivers to avoid deals that are too good to be true!

Counterfeits: Devices that appear to be 213-compliant CRs, but do not imitate any particular CR model  Like knockoffs, these devices may make claims that they meet federal regulations. However, they typically have clues to the contrary, such as cheaper-looking parts or missing labels. (Recent examples have been sold online as part of a stroller system.)

Imposters: These devices identify themselves as CRs using the language required by FMVSS 213 (in marketing materials, instructions, and labels). However, they do not meet FMVSS 213’s definition of a CR, so this claim is fraudulent. In addition, imposters often say they meet FMVSS 213 crash standards, but since they don’t qualify as a CR under that standard, these claims are baseless. Some seat belt adjusters are examples of imposters, as are devices with a five-point harness that are installed by wrapping a strap around the vehicle seatback (always a clear no-no in personal vehicles).

Other Confusing Products

Decoys: These devices are like imposters, but the manufacturer steers clear of making fraudulent claims of meeting FMVSS 213.  Nonetheless, promotion of such a product often willfully misleads the public into thinking that it is a legitimate alternative to a CR. For instance, many decoys state a starting weight limit of 80 pounds so as to fall outside the scope of FMVSS 213, yet their packaging and promotional materials show the device in use by much smaller/younger children. Since no rules or laws have been broken, the most that can be done is to educate the public about avoiding these products.

Foreign CRs: These are legitimate CRs that are designed to meet the standards of a foreign country, but not FMVSS 213. People visiting from abroad may use their foreign-made models for short stays (like while on vacation). However, people who plan to live in the U.S. for an extended period of time (for instance, on a work visa) should obtain a 213-compliant model. U.S. citizens should not purchase a foreign model for use in the U.S., and NHTSA should be notified if manufacturers or retailers are found to be offering to ship models that don’t meet U.S. regulations to U.S. addresses.

Stay Up to Date!

The current CR market is especially tricky, with online retailers able to pop up at will (and resurrect themselves elsewhere if called into question).  At the same time, several unusual CR features and designs—many inspired by foreign CRs—are now found in legitimate CRs in the U.S. market. Additionally, the demand for lightweight, portable options has led to the invention of products that manufacturers have carefully tested for safety but that do not strictly meet the FMVSS 213 definition of a CR (for instance, harness-like products that do not utilize a tether or boosters that do not boost). Are these “better mousetraps” by designers who have been thinking outside the box or simply imposters? These are questions regulators may need to address in the coming months.

Readers of SRN can count on coverage of new products—legitimate or otherwise—in this newsletter. Another way to check on a product and/or a CR manufacturer is to see if it’s included on the AAP’s annual product listing of CRs. (Remember, however, that this list is updated annually; while finding a model listed here is a good sign that it is legit, the absence of a model may simply mean it is new to the market, so further research would be necessary.)

In general, CPSTs with concerns about any product are encouraged to follow up. Contact the manufacturer and ask questions. Report lingering concerns to the manufacturer and to NHTSA (click on Report a Problem).

And don’t forget to share with SRN, as well. Hope to see you at the Lifesavers Conference in March!

Options for European Belt Routing Expanding

Graco now allows the use of European belt routing (aka Euro-routing) for baseless installation of all SnugRide CRs with Click Connect (including all SnugLock models) in the U.S. and Canada.  This permission is stated in the most recent instructions of most SnugRide models, but is also retroactively given on units of Click Connect SnugRides that do not state this permission in the instructions.  (Go to the FAQ section at www.gracobaby.com to find written permission from Graco.) Read More from “Options for European Belt Routing Expanding”